October 7, 2004

Republicans force soldiers to buy own socks...

You know those "shortage of body armor" complaints that Democrats have been repeating for the last year? Just more lies! Oak Leaf explains:

Yesterday in the debate, the Senator that “represents” the brave soldiers, of the 82nd Airborne Division (Hooah), stated as fact, “they sent 40,000 American troops into Iraq without the body armor they needed.” Unfortunately, as a soldier, I now must correct the Senator who wants to serve as my Commander in Chief.

One must first understand that in the Army, “equipment” is either individual equipment (personal property) or organizational equipment (unit property). Individual equipment would include such items as a uniform, while organizational equipment would include things like canteens, compasses, helmets and yes, body armor. It is interesting to note that, officers, unlike enlisted soldiers, have always had to purchase their own uniforms (individual equipment), right down to their socks and boots. Lets keep that a secret or Senator Edwards will make an advertisement stating that some soldiers in Iraq have to buy their own boots and socks! The advertisement would be factually correct, but would be as misleading as his body armor debate statement...

...It is true that approximately 40,000 soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan, did not have their own issued set of “interceptor body armor.” It is equally true that every soldier did not have their own issued compass. It is not true to infer, as Senator Edwards would, that 40,000 soldiers were on patrol without body armor and in need of a compass. Only a small percentage of soldiers are engaged in combat operations at any given time. Remember that this type of equipment is organizational equipment; it does not belong to the individual. A clerk typist, one of many jobs, working in a fortified defended structure has no need, nor any desire, to wear body armor. Because this is organizational equipment, body armor can be requested as needed from a supply point and then turned in when no longer needed. There was always enough body armor in Iraq and Afghanistan so two out of every three soldiers could be wearing issued body armor at any given time. In the very unlikely event that every soldier needed torso protection at the same time, 1990s manufactured “flak vests” were available for all other soldiers that were at less risk...

...Well, just who is buying body armor? Myself, for one. I have my own set, but not for reasons that Senator Edwards would want you to believe. Nor did my family have a bake sale to buy it. My own set is “tailored” for my body dimensions so I can function a little bit easier than the government issued version...

Posted by John Weidner at October 7, 2004 7:54 AM
Weblog by John Weidner