November 22, 2003

"one of the most-wanted 55 is my neighbor's uncle"

It's interesting to see how Iraqi weblogs are slowly starting to emerge and join the conversation. I think it's another example of something we are re-learning: It takes a lot of time for life as we know it to start up again in what was a totalitarian police state. The yammering critics have (or pretend to have) absurdly unrealistic ideas about how quickly things can be expected to change. [Reason #87 why Leftists dislike the study of history]. This is a selection from a post by Omar, at Iraq the Model:

Here are some answers to questions sent to me by one of the readers, I feel these questions are important and worth answering them....

-About unemployment: yes before the war more Iraqis had jobs, very little of those jobs were making enough money to keep a family alive and each official employee had to find a second job to support his family (for instance I, a dentist had to open a grocery to pay for daily life expenses).
Surely I gave it up after liberation....


-About affording more consumer goods: here's a simple example, one of my relatives who's a high school principle had to sell his furniture piece by piece to support and educate his 5 kids, his house was nearly empty a year ago (no TV no fridge. no car no air conditioner) today 7 months after liberation he has all these stuff, still looking for a car though, and his kids are much more properly fed and dressed....


-About women safety: it's been months since ordinary life came back to the streets of Baghdad and the rest of Iraq, and women do walk completely safe through all Baghdad even at night, and they do not have to cover up except in the holly cities of shia (najaf&kerbala)while elsewhere especially Baghdad and the northern parts of Iraq the majority of women do not cover-up, and there's absolutely no one trying to force such an attitude, though the mullahs are still preaching in the mosques about this as they have been doing for decades....


-About Iraqi police: they have the authority to investigate, do arrests, enforce law and they do patrol all over Iraq unaccompanied by coalition forces and they're well armed and I haven't witness a single situation of authority abuse.
-About detained people: I can't tell the exact number, maybe some thousands, I can tell you they have contact with their families, for example: one of the most wanted 55 who is detained by the coalition is my neighbor's uncle and his family was allowed to contact him through the red-cross and supplied him with his needs....

Posted by John Weidner at November 22, 2003 12:27 PM
Weblog by John Weidner